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THE CONCENTRATION CAMP NELSON ROLIHLAHLA MANDELA THE CONSTRUCTION OF MIDMAR DAM

THE HOWICK CONCENTRATION CAMP

During the Anglo-Boer War from 1899 to 1902, the British established a concentration camp on the outskirts of Howick. Natal had several concentration camps namely at; Ladysmith, Eshowe, Howick, Colenso, Pinetown, Pietermaritzburg Jacobs, Wentworth and at Merebank.

The second concentration camp to open in Natal was at Howick during January 1901. (The first camp was at Pietemaritzburg) The 3300 inhabitants of this camp, who came from both the Free State and the Transvaal were all housed in tents.
This camp at Howick was known as one of the better camps during the war. Most amenities were available to the notoriously republican inhabitants of this camp, while many worked on farms in the area or relaxed next to the Umgeni River and the bigger boys were also allowed to work as laborers on farms in the vicinity, thus earning a little money with which they were able to buy certain medical necessities and additional food.

The cemetery used to hold 64 British graves and 84 Boer graves, but all the graves remains were placed under the memorial - a monument to honour the women and children who died during their incarceration in the camp which marks the location, and was erected by the War Graves Commission. The Military Cemetery is close to the site of an Anglo/Boer War military hospital and concentration camp.

 

The Howick camp was closed in October 1902. Approximately 155 deaths occurred in the
Howick camp.